makemethesea:

mughalshit:

A Lady Singing
Possibly by Bhavani Das
India (Kishangarh), Mughal, 1740 - 1745
Gouache with gold on paper

Because of the seclusion of women in court society, portraits of ladies are rare in Indian painting. But the artists could observe accessible figures such as the court dancers and musicians. This singing-girl is depicted as a nayika, an ideal heroine according to poetical theory. Her lips parted in song, she plucks a green tanpura which bisects the page. Her arching eyebrow and elongated eye typify the ideal of physical beauty developed at Kishangarh.


I adore the eyes in Kishangarh art.

makemethesea:

mughalshit:

A Lady Singing

Possibly by Bhavani Das

India (Kishangarh), Mughal, 1740 - 1745

Gouache with gold on paper

Because of the seclusion of women in court society, portraits of ladies are rare in Indian painting. But the artists could observe accessible figures such as the court dancers and musicians. This singing-girl is depicted as a nayika, an ideal heroine according to poetical theory. Her lips parted in song, she plucks a green tanpura which bisects the page. Her arching eyebrow and elongated eye typify the ideal of physical beauty developed at Kishangarh.

I adore the eyes in Kishangarh art.


“You educate a man; you educate a man. You educate a woman; you educate a generation.”
and this is what the western news doesn’t show. Educated and Covered Muslim women are unimaginable for them.

“You educate a man; you educate a man. You educate a woman; you educate a generation.”

and this is what the western news doesn’t show. Educated and Covered Muslim women are unimaginable for them.

(via the-vile-inn)

acidadebranca:

constantincomp:

la rampe
Villa Savoye, Le Corbusier, 1929-1931, Poissy, France
photo ©constantin antoniou, 2011

1928-1931 | Le Corbusier | Villa Savoye, Poissy-sur-Seine, France

acidadebranca:

constantincomp:

la rampe

Villa Savoye, Le Corbusier, 1929-1931, Poissy, France

photo ©constantin antoniou, 2011

1928-1931 | Le Corbusier | Villa Savoye, Poissy-sur-Seine, France

computer-gaze:

Diana the Huntress Acura TL
2013

Yep. This sums it up. The contemporary world by and large. Diana the Huntress buckled in. No legs. No arms. Nowhere to go and no way to get there. A metaphor for nature subdued and secured. The world reined in and busted up. Nature vanquished. And, eventually, humanity too .  .  . because much as he hates to admit, man is still part of nature.

computer-gaze:

Diana the Huntress
Acura TL

2013

Yep. This sums it up. The contemporary world by and large. Diana the Huntress buckled in. No legs. No arms. Nowhere to go and no way to get there. A metaphor for nature subdued and secured. The world reined in and busted up. Nature vanquished. And, eventually, humanity too .  .  . because much as he hates to admit, man is still part of nature.

(via computer-gaze)

themorningnews:


Since the top five per cent of households own almost two-thirds of the wealth, it stands to reason that most American households don’t own very much at all. But the figures that Yellen presented are still shocking. In 1989, the bottom half of the distribution owned just three per cent of all wealth. By 2013, that figure had fallen to one per cent. No, that’s not a typo: half the country owns one per cent of its wealth.

Rising Inequality: Janet Yellen Tells It Like It Is

This can be likened to a snowball rolling down the side of a mountain. Those who possess the greatest wealth exert the greatest influence on policy decisions at the highest political and corporate levels. This initial imbalance then tends to increase more and more with time because those who wield the most influence generally write policy in such manner as to favor their own positions both in the present and in the future. Welcome to the USA, “land of the free”, land of the controlling and the controlled.

themorningnews:

Since the top five per cent of households own almost two-thirds of the wealth, it stands to reason that most American households don’t own very much at all. But the figures that Yellen presented are still shocking. In 1989, the bottom half of the distribution owned just three per cent of all wealth. By 2013, that figure had fallen to one per cent. No, that’s not a typo: half the country owns one per cent of its wealth.

Rising Inequality: Janet Yellen Tells It Like It Is

This can be likened to a snowball rolling down the side of a mountain. Those who possess the greatest wealth exert the greatest influence on policy decisions at the highest political and corporate levels. This initial imbalance then tends to increase more and more with time because those who wield the most influence generally write policy in such manner as to favor their own positions both in the present and in the future. Welcome to the USA, “land of the free”, land of the controlling and the controlled.