historical-nonfiction:

Interesting facts about this populous and modernizing African nation
the country has over 250 ethnic groups, but three make up the majority: the Igbo, Hausa-Fulani, and Yoruba make up 18%, 29%, and 21% respectively
"Nollywood" is the second-largest movie producer in the world, making 200 movies a week! (Bollywood is #1)
it is the most populous African nation and 7th in the world
the Portuguese reached Nigeria in 1472
but it was British imperialism that left the deeper mark — British conquest began in 1880 and reached the modern northern border in 1903
Yoruba and their bloodlines worldwide have the highest rate of twinning (having twins) in the world. 
under the British, there was official segregation between “foreigners” and “Nigerians”
the ”Aguda” is a specific population of repatriated Cuban and Brazilian slaves, which includes descendents of slaves who participated in the Brazilian “Great Revolt” of 1835

historical-nonfiction:

Interesting facts about this populous and modernizing African nation

  • the country has over 250 ethnic groups, but three make up the majority: the Igbo, Hausa-Fulani, and Yoruba make up 18%, 29%, and 21% respectively
  • "Nollywood" is the second-largest movie producer in the world, making 200 movies a week! (Bollywood is #1)
  • it is the most populous African nation and 7th in the world
  • the Portuguese reached Nigeria in 1472
  • but it was British imperialism that left the deeper mark — British conquest began in 1880 and reached the modern northern border in 1903
  • Yoruba and their bloodlines worldwide have the highest rate of twinning (having twins) in the world. 
  • under the British, there was official segregation between “foreigners” and “Nigerians”
  • the ”Aguda” is a specific population of repatriated Cuban and Brazilian slaves, which includes descendents of slaves who participated in the Brazilian “Great Revolt” of 1835

(via kokujinkun)

lecinematheque:

Pumzi - dir. Wanuri Kahiu // Kenya

In a dystopian future 35 years after an ecological WWIII  has torn the world apart, East African survivors of the devastation remain locked away in contained communities, but a young woman in possession of a germinating seed struggles against the governing council to bring the plant to Earth’s ruined surface.

genqueue

Pumzi is a Kenyan science-fiction short film written and directed by Wanuri Kahiu. It was screened at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival as part of its New African Cinema program. [Wikipedia]

Pumzi, the website

Pumzi, the trailer

Pumzi, the film (running time 21:50)

visitheworld:

The amazing location of Tiger’s Nest Monastery in Bhutan (by john willis).

Paro Taktsang

visitheworld:

The amazing location of Tiger’s Nest Monastery in Bhutan (by john willis).

Paro Taktsang

(via sandalsandthemagnacarta)

What does it even mean to be “whole”?

nuanced-subversion:

I understand not wanting to be in a relationship with a person who refuses to be accountable for meeting their needs and emotional growth…but I think that one of the most unhelpful things that I’ve been told was that you need to be “whole” in order to be with someone.

What does it even mean to be “whole”? Does it mean that I’m 100%, 100% of the time? Does it mean that my insecurities never have a significant impact on how I feel on a given day? Does it mean that I need to have healed from all of my trauma - which is a lifelong process in itself - before I can be in partnership with someone else?

I think that we should be moving away from this idea of wholeness and towards opening up ways to have honest conversations with our partner(s) about capacity, support, and who is able to hold space at a given time. That to me is more realistic, relieves a lot of unnecessary pressure, and makes more sense.

nuanced-subversion:


One of the supposed characteristics of primitive peoples was that we could not use our minds or our intellects. We could not invent things, we could not create institutions or history, we could not imagine, we could not produce anything of value…we did not practice the ‘arts’ of civilization. By lacking such virtues we disqualified ourselves, not just from civilization but from humanity itself. In other words we were not ‘fully human’…Imperialism provided the means through which concepts of what counts as human could be applied systematically as forms of classification…In conjunction with imperial power and with ‘science’, these classification systems came to shape relations between imperial powers and indigenous societies.


The European powers had by the nineteenth century already established systems of rule and forms of social relations which governed interaction with the indigenous peoples being colonized. These relations were gendered, hierarchical and supported by rules, some explicit and others masked or hidden. The principle of ‘humanity’ was one way in which the implicit or hidden rules could be shaped. To consider indigenous peoples as not fully human, or not human at all, enabled distance to be maintained and justified various policies of either extermination or domestication.

- Linda Tuhiwai Smith | Decolonizing Methodologies

nuanced-subversion:

One of the supposed characteristics of primitive peoples was that we could not use our minds or our intellects. We could not invent things, we could not create institutions or history, we could not imagine, we could not produce anything of value…we did not practice the ‘arts’ of civilization. By lacking such virtues we disqualified ourselves, not just from civilization but from humanity itself. In other words we were not ‘fully human’…Imperialism provided the means through which concepts of what counts as human could be applied systematically as forms of classification…In conjunction with imperial power and with ‘science’, these classification systems came to shape relations between imperial powers and indigenous societies.

The European powers had by the nineteenth century already established systems of rule and forms of social relations which governed interaction with the indigenous peoples being colonized. These relations were gendered, hierarchical and supported by rules, some explicit and others masked or hidden. The principle of ‘humanity’ was one way in which the implicit or hidden rules could be shaped. To consider indigenous peoples as not fully human, or not human at all, enabled distance to be maintained and justified various policies of either extermination or domestication.

- Linda Tuhiwai Smith | Decolonizing Methodologies

(via sambwmn)

brandomarlons:

I don’t think that people generally realise what motion picture industry has done to the American Indian, as a matter of fact, all ethnic groups, all minorities, all non-whites. And people just simply don’t realise, just take it for granted that that’s the way people are going to be presented and these clichés are just, I mean on this network every night, well perhaps not every night, but you can see silly renditions of human behaviour, the leering Filipino houseboy, the wily Japanese, the kook or the gook, black man, stupid Indian. It just goes on and on and on. And people actually don’t realise how deeply people are injured by seeing themselves represented, not so much the adults, who are already inured to that kind of pain and pressure, but children. Indian children seeing Indians represented as savage, as ugly, as nasty, vicious, treacherous, drunken. They grow up only with a negative image of themselves and it lasts a lifetime. 

Marlon Brando on why Sacheen Littlefeather presented a speech on his behalf during his Best Actor win for The Godfather at the 1973 Academy Awards

(via sambwmn)

sambwmn:

Guy Debord: The Life, Death, and Afterlife of a Brilliant Crank
by Christopher Byrd

"Primarily, Debord longed to see the social order pass. He wanted a life without “dead time,” so he positioned himself as the enemy of the daily grind, a scourge to consensus. The “spectacle” was his name for the network of socio-cultural-economic forces with a vested interest in keeping people ensnared in a set of permissible routines: go to work, go home, watch TV, cheer on your favorite political team and, between those obligations, buy something.
The spectacle was Debord’s conceptual gift to the public, a tool to get people thinking about ideology. He dared his contemporaries to imagine a different life for themselves, one that was not defined by their participation in consumer society or fealty to prosperous, self-serving politicians. Concessions and deference were not his forte. Thus, to pass through his works or those of The S.I. is, at best, to apply a loofah to one’s ideological makeup and, at worst, to feel shoved into a game of ideological jousting waged by nihilists.”


"The Situationists railed against the homogenization of urban landscapes: the partitioning of the city into areas consecrated to specific activities (industry, commerce, residency, etc.). Unitary urbanism was the banner under which the S.I. promoted a vision of life as play: dynamic environments that encouraged spontaneous participatory games. Founding Situationist Constant Anton Nieuwenhuys’s ‘New Babylon Project’ offered architectural models and drawings for what future cities might look like. Imagine gigantic erector sets or playgrounds full of ladders and walkways that encouraged people to engage more with the public space they moved through, rather than dart from home to work. 
Both dérive and psychogeography were meant to thrust this critique out of the theoretical realm through the practice of going outside and placing one foot in front of the other. To dérive was to drift. All it demanded was an appetite for walking and a willingness to pocket away thoughts of schedules and destinations. The idea was to cultivate a purposeful displacement and experience one’s surroundings in ways outside of the usual patterns of everyday existence. To chart the effects of these surroundings upon one’s mood was to practice psychogeography.
Behind all of these activities lay the concept of détournement, or appropriation. One could detour one’s environment by introducing into it a new activity—say, hold a potlatch in the lobby of a bank or replace the soundtrack of an action movie with one full of revolutionary chatter, like René Viénet did in Can Dialectics Break Bricks (1973). The success of a détournement can be reckoned by how well it works to short-circuit processes of societal conditioning (the reverence for intellectual property rights, for example).”

[read the rest here]

sambwmn:

Guy Debord: The Life, Death, and Afterlife of a Brilliant Crank

by Christopher Byrd

"Primarily, Debord longed to see the social order pass. He wanted a life without “dead time,” so he positioned himself as the enemy of the daily grind, a scourge to consensus. The “spectacle” was his name for the network of socio-cultural-economic forces with a vested interest in keeping people ensnared in a set of permissible routines: go to work, go home, watch TV, cheer on your favorite political team and, between those obligations, buy something.

The spectacle was Debord’s conceptual gift to the public, a tool to get people thinking about ideology. He dared his contemporaries to imagine a different life for themselves, one that was not defined by their participation in consumer society or fealty to prosperous, self-serving politicians. Concessions and deference were not his forte. Thus, to pass through his works or those of The S.I. is, at best, to apply a loofah to one’s ideological makeup and, at worst, to feel shoved into a game of ideological jousting waged by nihilists.”

"The Situationists railed against the homogenization of urban landscapes: the partitioning of the city into areas consecrated to specific activities (industry, commerce, residency, etc.). Unitary urbanism was the banner under which the S.I. promoted a vision of life as play: dynamic environments that encouraged spontaneous participatory games. Founding Situationist Constant Anton Nieuwenhuys’s ‘New Babylon Project’ offered architectural models and drawings for what future cities might look like. Imagine gigantic erector sets or playgrounds full of ladders and walkways that encouraged people to engage more with the public space they moved through, rather than dart from home to work. 

Both dérive and psychogeography were meant to thrust this critique out of the theoretical realm through the practice of going outside and placing one foot in front of the other. To dérive was to drift. All it demanded was an appetite for walking and a willingness to pocket away thoughts of schedules and destinations. The idea was to cultivate a purposeful displacement and experience one’s surroundings in ways outside of the usual patterns of everyday existence. To chart the effects of these surroundings upon one’s mood was to practice psychogeography.

Behind all of these activities lay the concept of détournement, or appropriation. One could detour one’s environment by introducing into it a new activity—say, hold a potlatch in the lobby of a bank or replace the soundtrack of an action movie with one full of revolutionary chatter, like René Viénet did in Can Dialectics Break Bricks (1973). The success of a détournement can be reckoned by how well it works to short-circuit processes of societal conditioning (the reverence for intellectual property rights, for example).”

[read the rest here]

(via femmeviva)