socialfoto:

Cappadocia, Turkey by darrenleejw

Cappadocia, Turkey by darrenleejw on ViewBug

socialfoto:

Cappadocia, Turkey by darrenleejw

Cappadocia, Turkey by darrenleejw on ViewBug

agelfeygelach:

nitaohoyo:

Before Martin Luther King Jr, there was Elizabeth Peratrovich (Tlingit Nation) from Alaska! She was instrumental in passing the FIRST Anti-Discrimination Act (1945) in the USA! As Grand Camp President of the Alaska Native Sisterhood, Elizabeth provided the crucial testimony that cultivated passage of the Anti Discrimination Bill. It was her response when questioned by the Senate — Will the equal rights bill eliminate discrimination in Alaska? — that split the opposition and allowed the bill to pass.Elizabeth answered,"Have you eliminated larceny or murder by passing a law against it? No law will eliminate crimes but, at least you as legislators, can assert to the world that you recognize the evil of the present situation and speak your intent to help us overcome discrimination."As Elizabeth stepped down from the Senate platform, the galleries and some of the senators gave her a rousing acclaim. The Senate passed the bill 11 to 5. A new era in Alaska’s racial relations had begun. Elizabeth Peratrovich died on December 1, 1958, after a lengthy battle with cancer. She is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Jeneau.It was not until many years later that Elizabeth’s efforts to secure equality for all Alaskans won recognition. In 1988, the Alaska Legislature established February 16 as “The Annual Elizabeth Peratrovich Day,” the anniversary of the signing of the Anti-Discrimination Act. Every year since that day, Alaskans pause to remember her, dedicating themselves to the continuation of her efforts to achieve equality and justice for all Alaskans of every race, creed, and ethnic background. [Source]

recognize indigenous women, celebrate indigenous women, and never forget their names. They are not a Disney cartoon caricature. They are heroes.

agelfeygelach:

nitaohoyo:

Before Martin Luther King Jr, there was Elizabeth Peratrovich (Tlingit Nation) from Alaska! She was instrumental in passing the FIRST Anti-Discrimination Act (1945) in the USA! 

As Grand Camp President of the Alaska Native Sisterhood, Elizabeth provided the crucial testimony that cultivated passage of the Anti Discrimination Bill. It was her response when questioned by the Senate — Will the equal rights bill eliminate discrimination in Alaska? — that split the opposition and allowed the bill to pass.

Elizabeth answered,

"Have you eliminated larceny or murder by passing a law against it? No law will eliminate crimes but, at least you as legislators, can assert to the world that you recognize the evil of the present situation and speak your intent to help us overcome discrimination."

As Elizabeth stepped down from the Senate platform, the galleries and some of the senators gave her a rousing acclaim. The Senate passed the bill 11 to 5. A new era in Alaska’s racial relations had begun. Elizabeth Peratrovich died on December 1, 1958, after a lengthy battle with cancer. She is buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Jeneau.

It was not until many years later that Elizabeth’s efforts to secure equality for all Alaskans won recognition. In 1988, the Alaska Legislature established February 16 as “The Annual Elizabeth Peratrovich Day,” the anniversary of the signing of the Anti-Discrimination Act. Every year since that day, Alaskans pause to remember her, dedicating themselves to the continuation of her efforts to achieve equality and justice for all Alaskans of every race, creed, and ethnic background. 

[Source]

recognize indigenous women, celebrate indigenous women, and never forget their names. They are not a Disney cartoon caricature. They are heroes.

(via sarkos)

codedrhythmtalk:

Close to finishing this.
One of the strangest and most intriguing ideas i’ve ever read in a novel is in this book. One of the characters dies quite early on, complete with a detailed description of his dying moments. His self awareness slips out of his body and returns to the collective consciousness, and whilst the main story follows his family’s response to his death, it’s interspersed with passages of his consciousness floating around in the collective.
His family hold some seances and manage to contact him a few times, although the medium keeps wrongly reinterpreting what the dead man says into half nonsense. It almost reads like an exact description of what I imagine it’s like to experience ego death on psychedlic drugs and then try to hold a rational conversation with people who aren’t tripping.

codedrhythmtalk:

Close to finishing this.

One of the strangest and most intriguing ideas i’ve ever read in a novel is in this book. One of the characters dies quite early on, complete with a detailed description of his dying moments. His self awareness slips out of his body and returns to the collective consciousness, and whilst the main story follows his family’s response to his death, it’s interspersed with passages of his consciousness floating around in the collective.

His family hold some seances and manage to contact him a few times, although the medium keeps wrongly reinterpreting what the dead man says into half nonsense. It almost reads like an exact description of what I imagine it’s like to experience ego death on psychedlic drugs and then try to hold a rational conversation with people who aren’t tripping.

The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.

H.P. Lovecraft (1890 -1937)"The Call of Cthulhu" (1926)

Howard Phillips Lovecraft

   Howard P. Lovecraft in 1915

More H.P. Lovecraft on the Web: 1, 2

entrecomics:

(Steve Ditko)

Steve Ditko
topherchris:


"Jesus fucking Christ, Houston. We’re on the fucking moon."

Forty-five years ago today.

topherchris:

"Jesus fucking Christ, Houston. We’re on the fucking moon."

Forty-five years ago today.

(via writebastard)