emergentfutures:

The Most Important Economic Chart
The chart shows that productivity, or output per hour of work, has quadrupled since 1947 in the United States. This is a spectacular achievement by an advanced economy.
The gains in productivity were quite widely shared from 1947 to 1980. Real income for the median U.S. family doubled during this time just as output per hour of work performed doubled. The rising tide was lifting all boats.
However, what we want to focus on today is the remarkable separation in productivity and median real income since 1980. While the United States is producing twice as much per hour of work today compared to 1980, a small part of the gain in real income has gone to the bottom half of the income distribution. The gap between productivity and median real income is at an historic all-time high today.
Full Story: House of Debt

For the past generation the average American has been living the life of the new serfdom and most still don’t realize this is so. (Or maybe they do and that is why workmanship has become so shoddy.)

emergentfutures:

The Most Important Economic Chart

The chart shows that productivity, or output per hour of work, has quadrupled since 1947 in the United States. This is a spectacular achievement by an advanced economy.

The gains in productivity were quite widely shared from 1947 to 1980. Real income for the median U.S. family doubled during this time just as output per hour of work performed doubled. The rising tide was lifting all boats.

However, what we want to focus on today is the remarkable separation in productivity and median real income since 1980. While the United States is producing twice as much per hour of work today compared to 1980, a small part of the gain in real income has gone to the bottom half of the income distribution. The gap between productivity and median real income is at an historic all-time high today.

Full Story: House of Debt

For the past generation the average American has been living the life of the new serfdom and most still don’t realize this is so. (Or maybe they do and that is why workmanship has become so shoddy.)

(via secretrepublic)

littlebigdetails:

Facebook - The nearby friends feature shows your own picture with your partner’s (if available) to illustrate its use.
/via superamit

A world in the making. Soon it will be almost impossible ever to be alone with oneself and one’s own thoughts unless one makes a resolute effort.

littlebigdetails:

FacebookThe nearby friends feature shows your own picture with your partner’s (if available) to illustrate its use.

/via superamit

A world in the making. Soon it will be almost impossible ever to be alone with oneself and one’s own thoughts unless one makes a resolute effort.

(via arcanumarchive)

artchipel:

Art Writer’s Wednesday 25 - Artist on Tumblr

Hiki Komori | on Tumblr (b.1979, France)

Hikikomori, literally “pulling inward”, is a Japanese term to refer to the phenomenon of reclusive individuals who withdraw from society, seeking extreme degrees of isolation. French artist taking the name of Hiki Komori combines human faces and bodies with architecture or natural elements, offering a series of exquisite and enigmatic portraits. Capturing the essence of the chosen solitude, these double exposure portraits invite viewers to the introspection. Intrigued by the person behind these powerful images, Artchipel invites Hiki Komori to speak about his personal story, creative process and his perspective on solitude.

Artchipel: Who is Hiki Komori? Tell us a bit more about your personal and educational background.
Hiki Komori: I always being fascinated by the collage. My mother used to make some as sketch for her painting. When I was ten, my grandmother bought me a comic book illustrated by Dave Mckean, “Arkham Asylum”. It was a revelation. I started to draw, but it was awful (laugh), so I turn into photography. I tried different mediums, from orthochromatic to Polaroid, and discovered Photoshop. I was doing my first collage, playing with layers, trying my best to “pull out what was in my head”.

Beside, I grew up with Mckean, a real inspiration, and other artists such as Bill Sienkiewicz, Ashley Wood. I’m also introduced to some great photographers thanks to a friend with a great art and cultural baggage: Joel Peter Witkin, Jan Saudek, David Nebreda and finally Mark Weaver. If he is reading this right now, I wish him to know how grateful I am.

A: How has the double exposure photography initially captured your attention?
HK: I used to make some as @pixtagram, with a series called “ghosts”. I wanted it to be simple, so I started shooting subject with an app called “true HDR”, that wasn’t really made for that kind of treatments. The principle was simple: shooting two pictures, one with the subject, and one without, and mix them. Here’s an example (view image) that was my first experiment with double exposure.

Later I tried different techniques. Finally I combined both collage and double exposure, which gave a satisfying result. But something happened and I stop creating for almost a year…

A: You use a mixture of human portraits and architecture or natural elements to create magical compositions. Can you give us a general overview of your work and share with us your creative process?
HK: I wanted something that expresses “the world in my head”. I first started to watch over the web for similar artistry and have discovered Dan Mountford (cf. Tumblr | previous posts on Artchipel). I fell for it and totally assume that my work is inspired directly from his. But spontaneously, that’s what was coming out from me.

I have a huge stock of industrial landscapes, structural shapes and trees photos. I just shoot portraits and try different combinations until I get a good result. I switch it to black and white with high level contrasts than colorize them to add a twist to vintage style.

A: Your images stand out for their soft aged appearance and the emotion that evokes. What themes do you pursue?
HK: Loneliness. There is a world around me and a world inside me. I’m trying to pull the world out of my head. And to forget… or to forgive.

A: Where do you find your image resources for your work? Are some of them personally connected to you?
HK: Most of them are self-portraits. But recently, I also shoot other subjects. All of them are connected to me. They are my family, friends or people who made me feel something through their works.

A: Do you have special rituals to get into creating mood?
HK: Alone at night, drunk most of the time (shame on me).
 
A: How do you use social medias such as Tumblr and Instagram as an artist?
HK: Social medias help me to enhance my visibility and to get some feedback about my works. I also met people I envision to work with. I recently contact other instagrammers to collaborate. Some answers and other don’t. Wait and see.

A: Do you seek out times for solitude for yourself? What does that mean for you?
HK: Yes I am. This is a space between me and other, a space where I can’t hurt nobody, and no one can hurt me. I’m sociable and like others’ company, but I also appreciate when I return to my solitude. It’s like if you’re listening to some awesome and powerful music. When it stops, you really enjoy the quiet and calm silence.

Thanks Hiki Komori for taking time out to answer these questions. Hiki Komori can be found with updated posts on his Instagram and Tumblr. © All images courtesy the artist

[more Hiki Komori | Art Writer’s Wednesday with Artchipel]

(via momentofpoetry)

presstvchannel:

An Afghan youth pushes a wheelbarrow during sunset in Mazar-i-Sharif on April 22, 2014. Afghanistan remains at war, with civilians among the hardest hit as the Taliban wage an increasingly bloody insurgency against the government.

presstvchannel:

An Afghan youth pushes a wheelbarrow during sunset in Mazar-i-Sharif on April 22, 2014. Afghanistan remains at war, with civilians among the hardest hit as the Taliban wage an increasingly bloody insurgency against the government.

serendippitea:
The Waterfall Fairy by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite

Ida Rentoul Outhwaite, also known as Ida Sherbourne Rentoul and Ida Sherbourne Outhwaite (9 June 1888 – 25 June 1960), was an Australian illustrator of children’s books. Her work mostly depicted fairies. [Wikipedia]

serendippitea:

The Waterfall Fairy by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite

Ida Rentoul Outhwaite, also known as Ida Sherbourne Rentoul and Ida Sherbourne Outhwaite (9 June 1888 – 25 June 1960), was an Australian illustrator of children’s books. Her work mostly depicted fairies. [Wikipedia]